April 13, 2018

Computer Assisted Property Valuation

If you are moving home, getting a reliable property valuation is an essential step in the process.

A property valuation will give you an estimate of how much your house should be worth, based upon a number of different factors.

Even if you are not planning to move home straight away, house valuations remain an excellent tool to indicate a current market value and what improvements could be made should you want to potentially increase the value of your home without over capitalising.

By answering a few easy questions on the current condition of your home, our free property value calculator which uses the latest GIS (Geographic Information Systems) will give you an idea of how much money you could potentially make from the sale of your home.

Unique to Valuator we are also able to reference recent final property sales (selected Cape Town metropolitan areas) that have not yet been recorded in the Deeds Office which makes our report that much more current and reliable!

Get your free Valuator report today!
These reports are free until 1st June 2018

Valuator is a service operated in association with Chas Everitt by:

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April 5, 2018

New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations

South Africa’s new plug and socket standard, SANS 164-2 or ZA Plug, has become mandatory for new installations, the SABS confirmed to MyBroadband.

This means that any new buildings erected must incorporate electrical sockets that conform to the new standard.

An amendment to the wiring code introduced in 2016 stated that the ZA Plug would become semi-mandatory for new installations in March 2018.

Each new plug point must have at least one socket that can accommodate a ZA Plug, it said.

The amendment came into effect two months early, said the SABS, and from January 2018 all new installations must incorporate the ZA Plug.

The ZA Plug has the same hexagonal profile as the Europlug seen on cell phone chargers but includes an earth pin. It is substantially more compact than South Africa’s three-prong plug standard and has much thinner pins.

Adoption of the standard has been slow, however.

Gianfranco Campetti, the chairman of the working group that looks after the standard, said the industry has been slow to respond and use the standard in essential products.

He said the appliance industry, in particular, has been slow to provide goods with the new plug.

The switch

When the IEC first began development on IEC–906–1, which became IEC60906–1, it was trying to establish a universal plug and socket system.

Despite its efforts, commercial and political interests caused the standardisation initiative to fail in Europe – and Brazil and South Africa are the only countries to have adopted the 250V standard.

However, Brazil deviated from the standard by delivering either 127V or 220V mains using the same socket.

Japan and the US have plugs and sockets that are compatible with the IEC’s envisioned global standard for 125V sockets.

Talk of adopting the new standard began in South Africa in 1993, and a version of SANS 164–2 that dates back to 2006 is available online.

According to the SABS, the ZA Plug appeared in South Africa’s wiring code (SANS 10142–1) during 2012.

Old standard still legal

Although it is now required to integrate sockets which comply with the ZA Plug standard in new buildings, the old standard remains legal.

The wiring code amendment also does not affect existing buildings, including homes.

It is therefore not currently necessary for South Africans to switch the electrical sockets in their homes.

Article source

March 1, 2018

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Bramble is an online platform aimed at connecting students wanting to sell or buy textbooks, as well as physical and electronic notes. This not only allows students to earn an extra income, but it also makes the learning process a whole lot easier.

As students ourselves, we understand the real life of a student and we hope to give you more room for the good life, more time for studying and, most importantly, more money at the end of the month.

The Bramble platform has one major beneficiary,

– the students.

We hope that the creation of a platform that allows students to set their own prices will allow shopping for textbooks to be more affordable and less stressful.


This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt International 

February 22, 2018

Water meter readings

From the City of Cape Town:

Your home or business is connected to the City’s water network through a water meter, which usually sits in a small chamber under the pavement outside your property. We read your water meter once a month to calculate your monthly water and sewerage use.

How the City reads your water meter

The meter is read by a different person each month. We take a meter reading using a handheld computer terminal that contains core information about the property, such as the erf number and the address.

If we cannot read your meter (due to your gate being locked or other circumstances) and you do not submit your water reading, your bill will be an estimate based on your previous water use. All cost estimates will be reversed, if necessary when we get an actual reading.

DID YOU KNOW? Well-run City: Each year, we replace about 9 000 old or malfunctioning water meters. 

You can help us get an accurate reading for your water meter by doing the following:

  • Make sure you know where your water meter is located.
  • Make sure it is not obstructed (e.g. by sand or weeds) and is easy to read.
  • Your water meter should be accessible to City officials at all times.
  • If your water meter is behind locked gates, or if dogs prevent the meter readers from taking a reading, you can submit the reading yourself (see below).
  • Alternatively, ask the City to relocate your meter to the outside of your house, via the City’s Service Requests application.

How to read your water meter

You can submit your water meter reading by calling 0860 103 089 or entering it online via your municipal account on our e-Services portal.

No matter the type of water meter, black numbers represent kilolitres and red numbers represent liters. As you are charged per kilolitre, only supply the black numbers when submitting your reading.

DID YOU KNOW?

Inclusive City: The City has installed free-call phones at some City facilities to allow you to make inquiries and request services at no cost.

Water and sanitation tariffs

All formal properties have water meters, which we use to read your water consumption and calculate your monthly bill. However, there are different tariffs for residences, businesses, and other organisations.

  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation in your home
  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation for your business or organisation

Report problems with your water meter

If your water meter is not being read regularly, is malfunctioning or needs to be relocated to outside of your property, please contact the City’s 24-hour call centre:

  • Call us on 0860 103 089 (choose option 2: water-related faults)
  • SMS: 31373 (max of 160 characters)
  • Whatsapp: 063 407 3699
  • Email: water@capetown.gov.za

You can also go to our service requests portal and report or request an issue online. If you need some help with how to place a service request or report an issue, please see Submit a service request.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

February 14, 2018

International Childhood Cancer Day

February 15, 2018

International Childhood Cancer Day which highlights the need for concerted global actions to address the growing challenge posed by this non-communicable disease. Globally, childhood and adolescent cancer is threatening to overtake infectious diseases, as one of the highest causes of disease-related mortality in children.

It is a day when we come together to continue the work to “Advance Cures and Transform Care” and to make childhood cancer a national and global child health priority.

Much work remains to be done. According to IARC (2015), the reported worldwide incidence of childhood cancer is increasing, from 165,000 new cases annually to 215,000 cases for children 14 years and younger and 85,000 new cases for 15-19 year-olds. Many more remain uncounted and unreported due to a lack of childhood cancer registries in a large number of countries.

While the number of children with cancer is much less compared to global incidence of adult cancers, the number of lives saved is significantly higher; survival rates in high-income countries reach an average of 84% and are steadily improving even in less-resourced areas of the world where there is local and international support.

The ICCD campaign’s ultimate goal and unified message is “Advance Cures and Transform Care”. This message spotlights the inequities and glaring disparity of access to care in most low- and middle-income countries where 80% of children with cancer live. Children and adolescents in Africa, Asia and Latin America and in parts of Eastern and Southern Europe do not yet have access to appropriate treatment including essential medicines and specialized care. Currently, where one lives often determines one’s ability to survive childhood cancer.

The 188 member organizations of Childhood Cancer International (CCI) in 96 countries as the largest non-profit patient support organization for childhood cancer and the 1000 healthcare professionals from 110 countries who are members of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) ask everyone to come together in solidarity to make sure children and adolescents everywhere have the chance to survive cancer and live long, productive and meaningful lives.

“The chance for a cure, the chance to live, should not be an accident of geography. There is nothing scarier than realizing that your child has cancer. However, there is nothing more tragic than knowing that treatment and cure does exist for your particular child’s cancer and with excellent outcomes, BUT… that it is not available for your child. Why? Because your child happens to live in the wrong hemisphere! It is time to take action to stop this cruel atrocity… makes your voices heard on International Childhood Cancer Day and demand from world leaders to ACT and HELP SAVE ALL CHILDREN regardless of where they live!”
(HRH Princess Dina Mired, mother of childhood cancer survivor, President-elect, UICC).

For the next 3 years ICCD will build on a campaign to:

  1. Build global awareness that more than 300,000 children each year are diagnosed with cancer.
  2. Build global awareness that many types of childhood cancer are curable if given:
    • The right to early and proper diagnosis;
    • The right to access life-saving essential medicines;
    • The right to appropriate and quality medical treatments, and;
    • The right to follow up care, services and sustainable livelihood opportunities for survivors.
  3. Work towards the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 to reduce premature mortality one-third by 2030.
    • Too often when it comes to childhood cancer we are faced with a response of “but.”
    • “But” there aren’t enough children to develop new drugs;
    • “But” the treatment is too expensive;
    • “But” there aren’t enough doctors,
    • “But”…Link to source and more information


February 14, 2018

The Fish Hoek Story

Author –Joy Cobern

Imagine living in the southern suburbs of Cape Town in the 1870s, where would you go for a day out and how would you get there? There were no cars and horses were expensive to keep unless you needed them for your business. Perhaps you knew someone with a horse and cart so, as a great treat you could go to Muizenberg beach. Then, in 1882, the railway was extended from Wynberg to Muizenberg and suddenly it became easy to have a day at the beach.

In those days Fish Hoek was a farm in the country with a beautiful but remote beach. In 1883 the railway line reached Kalk Bay but it was not until 1890 that it was extended to Simon’s Town passing along Fish Hoek beach. The owners of the farm, having seen Muizenberg become a fashionable resort after the arrival of the railway, could not have been pleased when the railway authorities wanted to purchase land for the line but they could not refuse. A station was built opposite what is now Windsor Lodge. This was just a wooden platform with no shelter from the south easter and it was not until about 1910, after many complaints from travellers that a small waiting room was built at each end of the platform.

At that time the owner of the Fish Hoek Farm was Hester de Villiers who lived in the farmhouse, on the site of the present Homestead Naval Mess, with her husband Izaak de Villiers. She had bought the farm in 1883. She was then fifty one years old, a teacher who, with her sister, had run a small school in Cape Town. For an unmarried lady of her age to buy property was very unusual, but she came to Fish Hoek and ran the farm on her own. At the age of sixty nine she married Jacob Izaak de Villiers who had a farm at Noordhoek. He left one of his sons to run his farm and came to run the Fish Hoek Farm with her.

Previous owners of the farm had mainly wanted it for the fishing rights, but Hester de Kock, as she was then, cultivated fields of wheat and vegetables and it was probably Hester who built the barn, now Mountain View cottages, this is the oldest building in Fish Hoek. As the farm expanded more water was needed so in 1902 she bought the water rights to the Kleintuin spring at Clovelly and pipes were laid to bring the water to Fish Hoek to irrigate the fields and supply the farmhouse.

The first official grant of land at Fish Hoek was made in 1818, by Lord Charles Somerset. One of the stipulations in that grant was that the beach should remain open to the public but as it was not easy to access the number of visitors was small. However, the building of the railway line changed that. It was now easy for the citizens of Cape Town to get on the train to Simon’s Town, get off at the Fish Hoek station, and walk, and perhaps picnic, on the beach. Izaak de Villiers kept a strict eye on them, any rowdy behaviour or leaving of litter and they would be immediately reprimanded. Talking to visitors it soon became obvious that many of them would like to be able to stay in the area. So Hester de Villiers started letting rooms in the farmhouse and, when this became popular converted the barn and the coach house to rooms. Uitkyk, the building on the site of the old whaling station, was converted to a holiday cottage and camping was allowed next to the barn. So it was that Hester de Villiers became our first Fish Hoek tourist entrepreneur.

Having no children of her own it seems that Hester had come to regard the eight children of Izaak’s first marriage as her own. In her will she left the farm to her husband but asked that on his death the land should be sold and the proceeds divided equally between all her step children but the farmhouse was left to her two step daughters. She left a sum of £150 “to be placed in the savings bank at Cape Town and used for the maintenance of the family cemetery”. She died in 1914 and Izaak in 1916. They are both, with other members of the family, buried in the family cemetery which is now beside the Dutch Reformed church in Fish Hoek, whose members look after it.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

February 13, 2018

The Clovelly Country Club Story

SHORT HISTORY OF THE CLOVELLY COUNTRY CLUB

The idea of a club history has been in the minds of many connected with Clovelly for some time. Those who recall the Club in its early days when it was virtually a club without a clubhouse, and later, in the immedi­ately pre-War years when things were a little easier, during the War years, the post-War years, the post-fire years and so on, are convinced that Clovelly does have, moreover, a ‘history’ which thoroughly deserves the telling.

The writer of the present one has, indeed, told the Chairman that, although the name Clovelly was formerly nothing to her except a suburban railway station ‘somewhere out Fish Hoek way’, she has since realised that its history, for sheer drama, variety, and as a record of progress against seemingly overwhelming odds, beats that of the Crusades, the Norman Conquest, and the Great Trek.

Naturally she would not have been able to carry out this assignment had it not been for the co-operation of a great many people who gave up their time to tell her about the Club in other days. Pre-eminent among these were Mr I Joelson and Dr E Greenwall, together with a great many past Chairmen and others who had assisted in getting Clovelly on its feet, ladies who had been instrumental in building up the ladies’ bowling and golf sections and, of course, Phyllis and Maurice Bodmer. She was also fortunate in obtaining the co-operation of Westlake Golf Club, which made it possible for her to ‘fill in’ many of the details of the Club’s earliest history which would otherwise have been missing.

Our Club historian, Pat Dickson, says that there is very little to say about her – as yet – as she is a career girl who hasn’t had a career, at least not the one she wanted. She describes herself as being ‘on the run from the teaching profession’, having featured in the latter for eight years, first in her home town, East London, and then in the Cape, before she returned to the University of Cape Town to further her studies.

The purpose of this was to obtain qualifications which would enable her to move from high school teaching into teacher-training, but although she finally achieved this goal in 1972, becoming an instructor in a training ­school under the Administration of Coloured Affairs, the writing of two theses (the second being for a Master’s degree, obtained in 1970), in addition to the unexpected success she enjoyed as a free-lance writer of magazine articles during her post-graduate student days, convinced her that she would rather be a professional writer of business histories than a teacher, instructor, or lecturer in anything, to anybody.

In retailing, one speaks of the ‘target customer’.  In bringing out a history of this nature it is hoped to appeal to two kinds of ‘target readers’: the more senior members who actually lived through this history (and who may quarrel with certain details of the story at times!), and the newer members, who found a ‘ready-made’ club, and may have wondered how it got that way.

Clovelly is the embodiment of a certain spirit, compounded not only of good fellowship and a mutual interest in promoting the ends of sport, but also of a special kind of tolerance, and the determination that was needed in days gone by to maintain this good fellowship and this tolerance.

Other clubs may have their histories, but that of Clovelly, like the club itself, is unique. If therefore, those who have joined this Club since World War II would like to know why Clovelly is as it is, one hopes that they will find most of the answers by dipping into the Short History offered here.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

February 9, 2018

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

Distributed on behalf of David Pena, Valley North Neighbourhood Watch:

JOIN US FOR A MASS HIKE TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

Are you tired of the senseless violent attacks on the mountains and beaches?

Are you fed up with the criminals and perpetrators owning the mountains and beaches?

Are you tired of feeling unsafe and unable to even take a short walk into the mountains for fear of your and your family’s lives, thus being restricted to built up areas?

Do you feel for the victims and their families who have been devastated by the attacks?

We’re organising a hike up Elsie’s Peak next week Saturday 10 February, TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

The goal: To promote awareness, show solidarity for this common cause and show support for the victims of the recent attacks as well as their families.

To guarantee safety for you and your family there will be an armed response, neighbourhood watches present at the parking and on the route. SAPS will be informed of the event.

Table Mountain Security Action Group members will be present.

The established “Take Back Our Mountains” hiking group has been informed of and fully support this Elsies Peak Hike.

Bring the whole family, bring a smile and let’s enjoy the mountain the way that we are supposed to and is our right to!

We’re going to take back our mountains and beaches, one trail at a time!!

Let’s make it a big group, to make a proper statement and to break the shackles that have been placed on us!!!”

ALL WELCOME – PLEASE SHARE

When: Sat 10 Feb, 09:00

Where: Golconda Street, Glencairn Heights, Start of Elsies Peak trail.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

February 7, 2018

Things to do this Valentine’s Day in Cape Town

Adore it or abhor it, you can’t escape the universal day of love. And while Valentine’s Day (14 February, for those who tend to forget) has become an age-old tradition defined by shop-bought red roses, heart-smattered teddy bears and boxes upon boxes of gooey chocolates, your personal Cupid-themed celebration doesn’t have to be quite so cliché. So, if you’re looking to spend Valentine’s Day in Cape Town (or any other amorous special occasion, for that matter), think outside the heart-shaped box and woo him or her with a truly inspired romantic escapade.

 

From incredible dinners and hotel stays to unique couples’ experiences and exclusive promos, here’s our pick of things to do this V-Day in Cape Town.

For More Information

Please note that booking is essential at each venue

SOME MORE ROMANTIC IDEAS AND EVENTS

Keep an eye out for some cool date ideas and a great selection of romantic things to do in Cape Town.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

February 5, 2018

Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

“Water saving features such as storage tanks, water efficiency devices, and boreholes in particular are unsurprisingly proving to be major selling features in Cape Town South, as property buyers are looking at the water problem as a long-term issue”, says Andre de Villiers, veteran Southern Suburbs real estate agent and owner of the Cape Town South group of four Chas Everitt offices.

“We are accordingly highlighting properties that we are marketing that feature such benefits as they definitely an attraction and we are of the opinion that for those interested in selling their property any such measures are well worth the additional investment to enhance the appeal and increase the competitive appeal and to protect one’s property value. We had a similar situation with load shedding and power saving devices not that long ago but with water-related issues there seems to be a greater value attached as it is not being seen as a temporary problem.”

“Pools are being seen as far less of an advantage and more of a hassle to be dealt with and water-wise gardens are also attracting a lot of positive discussions,” said de Villiers.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

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Current conditions for Lakeside as of Thu, 24 Mar 2016 9:59 pm SAST

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