Kite Festival – 2021 Dates Keenly Awaited!

Kite Festival – 2021 Dates Keenly Awaited!

CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL KITE FESTIVAL

Update:

The 2021 Cape Town Kite Festival will take place in October 2021. It will once again not be a traditionally physical festival; we will have a hybrid festival, partially online and physically through pop-up flies and community engagement flies.  This has been confirmed by Corné Mouton the Events Organiser.

To stay updated please follow the Kite Festival Facebook page (see link below) or this post!

Africa’s biggest kite festival and attracts over 20,000 visitors, including some of the biggest names in kiting in South Africa and the world who fly in to show off their magnificent kite creations.

With kite-making, kite-flying, food stalls, kiddies’ rides, a full programme of entertainment and an eclectic craft market, this is family entertainment at its best.

The Cape Town International Kite Festival happens on (and above) the lawns of Zandvlei Nature Reserve, Muizenberg (corner Axminster and The Row), from 10:00 to 18:00 daily. There is an entry fee payable on the day – proceeds go to Cape Mental Health, a not-for profit organization.

As soon as dates are confirmed we will share them here!  If you have any news on this event to share please contact us.

Please also refer to the Kite Festival Facebook Page

The Oldest Domestic Residential Building in South Africa

The Oldest Domestic Residential Building in South Africa

How many times have you driven past this property?  Did you know it is the oldest domestic residential building in South Africa built in 1673, in the Main Road, Muizenberg, known as De Post Huys.


HET POSTHUYS MUSEUM is one of the oldest buildings in South Africa, dating to circa 1742. It was built by the Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or VOC) as a toll-house to levy a tax on farmers passing by to sell their produce to ships lying in Simon’s Bay. One of the early postholders was Sergeant Muys (meaning “mouse”), from whom Muizenberg (formerly Muysenbergh and Muys Zijn Bergh (Muys’ mountain) before that) gets its name.

After a varied career as a police station, stables, brothel, hotel and private house the building was identified for what it was in the 1980s and restored with funds from Anglo American Corporation. The house is cared for by the Muizenberg Historical Conservation Society and contains a small collection of photos and items of interest relating to early days in Muizenberg. It is open to the public.

Main Road, Muizenberg. First mapped in 1687; served as a look-out post for enemy ships entering False Bay. Later uses include preventing contraband trading, a storage place for naval goods, an ale and eating house, and a private residence. Anglo-American restored it in 1982-1983. It is run by the Muizenberg Historical Conservation Society. On-site is a video tracing its layered history.

Source

Are you looking to buy or sell something in the Lakeside area?  Contact Cathy Goosen for assistance.

Water Discolouration

Water Discolouration

The City of Cape Town is advising residents that water in the distribution system is currently discoloured over a large part of the eastern, central and southern suburbs.

“The discolouration is due to a process control fault at the Faure Water Treatment Plant. As a safety precaution, residents are advised to boil the water before drinking especially if it appears discoloured,” the City said in a statement. “We are now feeding the affected areas of the network from Blackheath Reservoir and the situation is anticipated to normalise over the next few days.”

The City is working on resolving the problem as soon as possible, and wishes to apologise to the public for any inconvenience.

Community notice sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Bee deaths – a ghastly truth revealed!

Bee deaths – a ghastly truth revealed!

The vice-chairperson of Western Cape Bee Industry Association (WCBA) and commercial bee farmer Brendan Ashley-Cooper has already lost 100 hives and he sent a sample to be tested in the Hearshaw & Kinnes Analytical Laboratory in Cape Town.

This week, Ashley-Cooper received the sample back confirming his fears. It is from fipronil, a pesticide used on ants.  On Friday wine farm owners and bee keepers held a meeting to discuss using pesticides.

stock image

Read more:  

Lakeside Community Watch Recycling

Lakeside Community Watch Recycling
A reminder to support LCW – Lakeside Community Watch Recycling tomorrow morning.
Where: Parking lot, Mountainview Baptist Church, corner of Main Road and Boyes Drive (opposite the Toad on the Road).
When: 7am9am, every Thursday.
Thank you to the residents of Lakeside, Zandvlei, Orchard Village, Kirstenhof and Muizenberg for your continued support.
If you have any small change to give with your recycling, it will make a big difference to Michael’s cost to hire the vehicle to remove the recycling (a record is kept of all monies received, and this is given to Michael once a month).
A reminder of the Recycling times:
every Thursday 7am – 9am.
May we please ask residents not to drop off their recycling before 7am: otherwise local vagrants ransack the recycling and create a huge mess by distributing the contents of recycling plastic bags everywhere.
A reminder that the first Thursday of every month there is an E-waste collection also (next E-waste collection is next Thursday, 1st November 2018).
LCW – Lakeside Community Watch:  “For the community, by the community.”

Muizenberg Kite Festival

Muizenberg Kite Festival

Africa’s biggest kite festival is proudly hosted by Cape Mental Health.

All profits go towards helping Cape Mental Health provide vital services to adults and children in resource-poor communities.

Watch amazing professional kiting displays – including giant inflatables, stunt kites and kite fighting – in the main arena.

Plus competitions, kite-making workshops, stalls and lots to eat and drink. Full programme.

More details


Curated content for Chas Everitt Cape Town South by eNeighbourhoods

 

Southern Suburbs Ranks Best For Organic Food Shops

Southern Suburbs Ranks Best For Organic Food Shops

The Inside Guide’s has released a list of the best organic food shops in Cape Town and plenty of them are in the Southern Suburbs.  You might say more than a fair share!

First on the list was Organic Zone in Lakeside

“Let food be thy medicine; and medicine be thy food.” – Hippocrates

In a perfect world, the food we eat would all be produced ethically and sustainably, devoid of chemicals, pesticides and antibiotics. In the real world, that’s sadly not the case… the food industry lost its way decades ago, thanks to a few greedy stakeholders more interested in turning a profit (selling GMO- and mass-produced crops) than in the wellbeing of our planet and its inhabitants.

Read more

Curated content by eNeighbourhoods for Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Chas Everitt Cape Town South – Spring Hampers for the Elderly

Chas Everitt Cape Town South – Spring Hampers for the Elderly

Chas Everitt Cape Town South are delighted that, for the first time, we are able to EXTEND our quarterly hamper project (called Our Mothers Our Fathers) outside of False Bay.

These hampers go to very deserving elderly beneficiaries.   We have been working with the great staff and organisers at Meals on Wheels to identify deserving elderly residents in Plumstead / Diep River area building on what we already do in the False Bay area.

Thank you to all who have contributed to making the Spring Hamper possible.

We will start collecting our Christmas Hamper early in November.  Donations can be dropped off at Chas Everitt Fish Hoek or Chas Everitt Tokai or Chas Everitt Bergvliet or if you call Eileen on 021 712 5029, we will if there are at least ten items collect contributions from you.

Well done to our many clients and friends who make these quarterly hampers ‘happen’ and the Chas Everitt Cape Town South team who ALL contribute so generously.  In particular thanks to our Hamper Co-ordinators, Diep River agent Joan Ross and our Plumstead agents Franlize Fourie and John Gentz.

For more details on Our mothers Our Fathers www.OMOF.co.za

 

Dam levels continue steady rise as restrictions are lowered

Dam levels continue steady rise as restrictions are lowered

Dam levels continue to improve and have risen 1,9% over the last week to 75,9% of storage capacity.

The average water consumption for the past week is up slightly from 511 million litres per day to 520 million litres per day.

Drips refracting the view of the Wellington waterfront from an old tap.

Water restrictions and tariffs have been lowered from Level 6b and Level 6 respectively to Level 5 from today, 1 October 2018, due to the encouraging dam recovery and the conservation efforts by Capetonians.

This is an interim measure to provide some relief to the City of Cape Town’s customers. Level 6b restrictions and Level 6 tariffs were there to cater to an extreme situation. The situation has changed materially due to good rainfall, the solid recovery of Cape Town’s dams and the great conservation efforts by residents and businesses.

Normally, the national government makes its determination on the water situation going forward in December. The City, however, believes that it is unfair to wait until December to make an announcement about water restrictions as this will lead to our customers having to pay the highest tariff for an unnecessarily long period of time.

The key elements of Level 5 restrictions are as follows:

  • An increase in the personal water use limit from 50 litres per person per day to 70 litres per person per day
  • A resetting of the overall City water usage target from 450 million litres per day to 500 million litres per day
  • A relaxation of restrictions for commercial and industrial water users from a 45% to a 40% usage reduction
  • A lowering of tariffs to Level 5 tariffs:

Residential tariffs (ex VAT)

  • 0 – 6 kL: Down 26,6% from R28,90/kL to R21,19/kL
  • 6 – 10,5 kL: Down 25% from R46/kL to R34,43/kL
  • 10 – 35 kL : Down 56% from R120,27/kL to R52,39/kL
  • Above 35 kL: Down 70% from R1 000/kL to R300/kL

Commercial and Industrial tariffs

  • Down 18% from R45,75/kL to R37,50/kL

Level 5 restriction don’ts

  • No watering/irrigation with municipal water is allowed. Nurseries or customers involved in agricultural activities, or those with gardens of historical significance, may apply for exemption
  • No topping up (manual or automatic) of swimming pools with municipal drinking water is allowed
  • No washing of vehicles, including cars, taxis, trailers, caravans or boats allowed with municipal drinking water
  • No washing or hosing down of hard surfaces with municipal water
  • The use of municipal drinking water for ornamental fountains or water features is prohibited
  • All private swimming pools must be fitted with a cover
  • The use of any portable or temporary play pools is prohibited
  • Should borehole/wellpoint water be used for outdoor purposes, including garden use, topping up of swimming pools and hosing down of surfaces, it should only be done for a maximum of one hour on Tuesdays and Saturdays before 09:00 and after 18:00. However, the City discourages the use of this water for these purposes to prevent the over-abstraction of aquifers
  • The operation of spray parks is prohibited
  • No new landscaping or sports fields may be established except if irrigated only with non-drinking water

Please visit www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater for all water-related information, such as the Level 5 guidelines.

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